Home Page for John A. Sandor, Forester from Juneau, Alaska

| STATEMENT |
| WORKING TOGETHER, THE SAF CAN MAKE IT HAPPEN |
| POLICIES AND ISSUES FROM MY PERSPECTIVE | LINKS |
| HOW TO CONTACT ME |


As the unsuccessful candidate for Vice President of the Society of American Foresters, I want to congratulate Vice President-elect Jim Coufal and the other newly elected leaders of the SAF in their national, state and chapter offices.

With President Harry Wiant, incoming President Karl Wenger, Vice President Jim Coufal along with the existing and new members of the SAF Council and State/Chapter offices, our SAF retains an outstanding leadership team that will continue to strengthen local, national and international forestry programs.

The recent SAF Convention and House of Society Delegates meeting in Memphis clearly demonstrated the capability of SAF leadership in every part of our nation. The plans and commitment for the leadership training, communication, education and centennial celebration initiatives will enable our Society to achieve its objectives. The level of success the SAF achieves over the next decade will be largely dependent upon the extent to which the individual members of our profession participate in these and other programs which promote the sound forestry practices essential for economic strength and a quality environment. I am very optimistic the SAF will be successful and pledge my continuing support of our SAF leadership and programs. With all members working together, the SAF can make it happen!

Finally, I want to express appreciation to my family and many friends and colleagues who were supportive of my candidacy for SAF Vice Presidnet. This gave me the opportunity to exchange ideas and develop new and renewed friendships in various parts of the country. Although I am disappointed in not being successful, I shall never regret the positive experience of participating in the process and will always value the many friendships and associations which are such an important part of the SAF. Thank you!

JOHN A. SANDOR, Juneau, Alaska - November 7, 1997

John A. Sandor, SAF Certified Forester and Fellow; owner of Historic Graphics and Alaska-Pacific Rim Consulting Services; retired after a four year appointment as Commissioner of the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation and 37 years with the US Forest Service. Since joining the SAF in 1952, he has served in a number of elected and appointed offices including the SAF Council (1985-1987), the Accreditation and Policy Committees and was co-chair of the 1994 National SAF/CIF Convention in Anchorage. He can be reached at (907) 586-2497, by e-mail: jsandor@ptialaska.net or Home Page http://www.ptialaska.net/~jsandor

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THE SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FORESTERS: WORKING TOGETHER, WE CAN MAKE IT HAPPEN

CELEBRATING OUR HERITAGE; A VISION FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

1997-2000: A TIME TO CELEBRATE, COMMUNICATE, EDUCATE AND BUILD A STRONGER SAF TO MEET THE CHALLENGES OF THE 21ST CENTURY

Since the American Forestry Association was founded in 1875 and the SAF in 1900, both organizations, with other pioneer conservationists, were successful in bringing abandoned and exploited forests under protection and management. Professional forest management on both public and private forest lands has proven to be effective in sustaining communities and providing the forest products, fish, recreation, water and wildlife resources essential for economic strength and a quality environment. Research was a key to many accomplishments of this century. We should celebrate these accomplishments and apply the lessons learned in developing a forestry vision for the 21st century from global, national, state and community perspectives. The SAF should lead these visioning efforts in partnership with others.

Following the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992, an Intergovernmental Panel on Forests was formed to develop an international agreement on forests. Although meetings of this panel have been held during the past five years, no agreement has yet been reached on a global policy on forests. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimates 95% of deforestation in the world is caused by clearing of lands for towns and farms; with about 50% of wood use for heating and cooking. Reports of the panel meetings indicate sharp differences between those who want to reduce wood use with substitute materials versus those who advocate sustainable forest management. I believe we should reverse the deforestation in the tropics by reforesting unused and inefficient farmlands and producing fuelwood sustainability. We should also encourage renewable forest products in place of non-renewable materials.

National and state forestry visioning efforts should have a firm foundation at the community and SAF Chapter level. For example, National Forests and other public forests must help assure community stability, economic vitality and a quality environment for the people dependent on those forests. Incentives should also be available for private land owners which would encourage long-term investments in healthy, productive and sustainable forests. The private sector and states offer the greatest promise for meeting our future needs.

The SAF's 1997 "Briefings on Forest Issues" and the State/Regional Societies have defined issues and positions appropriate for our Society. I support a strong SAF position-taking process, and recognize the State Societies must have the authority and means to respond to legislators' and other needs for professional advice in a timely manner. The SAF's diverse membership, philosophical beliefs and professional objectives will generate new strategies and initiatives that will aid our nation and the world meet the complex and changing challenges of the next century. Working together, the SAF can make it happen!

John A. Sandor; November 7, 1997

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POLICIES AND ISSUES FROM MY PERSPECTIVE

I served on the National SAF Policy Committee for three years and support a strong SAF position-taking process. National policy statements can also be bolstered with state society positions appropriate to that state. In developing the Alaska SAF position on the spruce beetle epidemic, our State Society was able to get quick approval through the National Office Policy Staff. Because of unique state conditions, state societies must be able to develop position statements and be ready to respond to State Legislature requests and other needs in a timely manner.

The SAF's 1997 "Briefings on Forest Issues" and the State/Regional Societies have defined issues and positions appropriate for our Society. Among the issues of special interest to me are:

(1) Education -Education programs should include the lessons of history and the role of forestry and forest products in responsible environmentalism. Excellent programs include: the California Institute for Teachers; the University of Minnesota's: Materials and the Environment: Wood as a Global Resource and the education program at the World Forestry Center in Portland, Oregon.

(2) Communication - Communication activities should recognize historical achievements and promote public understanding of forest management in forest health, economic strength, community stability and environmental quality.

(3) Maintaining/restoring forest health - This is urgent in the U.S. and the developing and recovering nations of the world. On a global scale, the SAF should expand its partnerships to help reverse the deforestation in the tropics by reforesting unused and inefficient farmlands and producing fuelwood sustainability. I support the Forest Health and Productivity Report endorsed by the SAF Council and the State Society positions addressing this issue.

(4) Human Values/Community Stability - Communities are dependent on forests and must be given greater consideration as ecosystem or plant and animal species protection plans are developed. Hundreds of mill closures in the Western U.S. and Alaska the past ten years have had profound adverse effects on many communities and families. When the Endangered Species Act is reauthorized, the Act must consider the rights of people as well as protecting plants and animals.

(5) The SAF Chapters, private sector and States offer the greatest promise for our future. Incentives can encourage long-term investments in healthy, productive and sustainable forests. All states should regain primary responsibility for management of resident fish and wildlife.

(6) The SAF's diverse membership and philosophical beliefs can generate the vision, strategies and initiatives to meet the challenges of the next century. Every SAF member's views are important. Please participate! Working together, we can assure a stronger SAF for the 21st century!

John A. Sandor; November 7, 1997.

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LINKS:

These links are provided as service to those who wish to find out more about the art and science of forestry.

The Society of American Foresters Home Page

USDA Forest Service Home Page

The World-Wide Web Virtual Library Forestry

National Association of State Foresters Home Page

JOHN A. SANDOR, Juneau, Alaska - November 7, 1997

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HOW TO CONTACT ME:

Please share your views or comments

by e-mail to: jsandor@ptialaska.net

or US Mail: PO Box 21135, Juneau, Alaska 99802-1135

or I can be reached at (907) 586-2497

JOHN A. SANDOR, Juneau, Alaska - November 7, 1997

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